Sunday, December 18, 2011

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park - January 2012 Programs


Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs - January 2012


Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park is only 30 Minutes from Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast:

Hawai‘i National Park, HI – Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors throughout January – which is also Volcano Awareness Month. These programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Mark your calendars for these upcoming events:

When: Tues., Jan. 3 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift Eruption: 29 Years and Counting. Jan. 3, 2012 marks the 29th anniversary of Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption. During its first three years, spectacular lava fountains spewed episodically from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent. Since then, nearly continuous lava effusion has built a vast plain that stretches from the east rift to the sea. This past year has seen many changes, including fissure eruptions and the collapse and refilling of the vent’s lava lake. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geologist Tim Orr will review highlights from the past 29 years and discuss recent developments on Kīlauea’s east rift zone. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.


When: Tues., Jan. 10 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
What’s Happening in Halema‘uma‘u Crater? In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea. Since then, the eruption has consisted of continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, ongoing ash emissions, and fluctuating lava pond activity in an open vent that has grown to more than 430 feet wide. While the eruption enthralls visitors, it also provides an abundance of data and insights for scientists. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Matt Patrick will present an overview of Kīlauea’s summit eruption. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

When: Tues., Jan. 17 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
Story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s First 100 Years. In 2012, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reaches its centennial milestone – 100 years of continuous volcano monitoring in Hawai‘i. Join HVO Scientist-in-Charge Jim Kauahikaua as he talks about Thomas Jaggar’s vision for the observatory, how Frank Perret began the work of monitoring Kīlauea Volcano, and HVO’s accomplishments during the past century. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

When: Wed., Jan. 18 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Nā Lei with Patricia Kaula. Hawaiians use lei for blessing crops, adornment for hula dancers, in healing and sacred rituals, and to show royal status or rank. Lei are also given to honor guests or as peace offerings, to celebrate a birth, and as expressions of love and expression. Join master lei artist Patricia Kaula as she shares nā lei, the art of traditional and modern lei making. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

When: Wed., Jan. 18 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
Kenneth Makuakāne Live in Concert. Join 12-time Nā Hoku Hanohano award-winning singer, songwriter, and producer Kenneth Makuakāne as he shares songs from his latest albums, The Dash, White Bath Tub, Makuakāne, and other compositions. A prolific songwriter, his songs are performed at the Merrie Monarch Festival and his music is featured on the soundtracks for motion pictures including Honeymoon in Las Vegas and Parent Trap in Paradise. Kenneth is widely recognized as an innovator in Hawaiian music and has more than 100 albums to his producing credit. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

When: Tues., Jan. 24 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
Mauna Loa: How Well Do You Know the Volcano in Your Backyard? Mauna Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, comprises more than half of the surface area of Hawai‘i Island. Mapping and dating show that 95 percent of this active volcano is covered with lava flows less than 10,000 years old. Since 1843, it has erupted 33 times. When Mauna Loa erupts, fast-moving, voluminous lava flows can reach the sea in hours, severing roads and utilities, repaving the flanks and building new land. The growth of Mauna Loa is far from complete as this huge volcano will undoubtedly erupt again. Join USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcanologist Frank Trusdell as he talks about Mauna Loa’s eruptive history and current status. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

When: Wed., Jan. 25 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Traditional Lei Making. Join kumu hula Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia and his wife Puamae‘ole O’Mahoney as they share the traditions of lei making for hula. Lei making is a vital and important part of the hula heritage and together, this husband-and-wife team teach the traditions handed down by generations. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

When: Tues., Jan. 31 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
Kīlauea’s Volcanic Gases and Their Environmental Impact. As magma rises from Earth’s mantle to the surface, volcanic gases expand, driving the spectacular fountains and flows of Hawaiian volcanoes. While Kīlauea’s current eruption produces enough lava to fill a football stadium every week, it also releases huge amounts of volcanic gases. Jeff Sutton and Tamar Elias, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geochemists, offer an update about volcanic gases, especially those related to the 2008-2011 activity at Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Learn about volcanic air pollution (vog), how it forms, and what we’ve learned about its effects on our island environment. BYON (Bring Your Own Nose) to the ever-popular “gas tasting” party where you can learn to identify volcanic gases by smell. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

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