Sunday, November 27, 2011

Hawaii Big Island - Sacred Sites - Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park


Sacred Sites on the Big Island of Hawaii - Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park


Kona is 2.5 hours drive from Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast:


Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park


For centuries, Hawaiian society, stratified into classes of chiefs, priests, skilled laborers and commoners, operated under a system of laws called kapu. The punishment for breaking the kapu, set forth by the gods, was death—unless the criminal fled to a puuhonua, or place of refuge.

One of the best-preserved puuhonua is located on the west coast of Hawaii, about 20 miles south of Kailua-Kona, in Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park. The structure, as it stands now, is a 300-foot-long stone wall, at points 18 feet high and 25 feet wide, which roughly forms a right angle. According to Eric Andersen, chief of interpretation at the park, the puuhonua was most likely built about 1,000 years ago and used until the late 1700s. (The kapu system was officially abolished in 1819.) The number of lawbreakers who lived at any given time in the safe haven, however, surviving on meager rations, is difficult to say.

The prisoners’ offenses ranged from the seemingly innocuous—catching a fish out of season—to the unequivocally serious—murder. “If you made it here and survived, then absolution was a gift when you left,” says Andersen. “Prisoners would meet with kahuna, or priests, and an understanding would be made in order to erase their wrongs.”

On one end of the wall is a thatched structure surrounded by kii, or wooden carvings resembling Hawaiian gods. The mausoleum, called Hale o Keawe, once housed the bones of 23 chiefs. The bones, thought to endow the site with mana, or spiritual power, were removed in the 1800s, but the place is still considered hallowed ground. The National Park Service has managed the site since 1961, and over 400,000 people visit the park annually. “There is a sense that there is something of reverence here,” says Andersen. “People have said that the mana is strong.”

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/Six-Sacred-Sites-of-Hawaii.html#ixzz1ew8A72qm

Monday, November 21, 2011

Hawaii Big Island - Sacred Sites - Puu Loa Petroglyphs


Sacred Sites on the Big Island of Hawaii - Puu Loa Petroglyphs


Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park is only 30 Minutes from Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast:


About 16 miles from the rim of Kilauea, on the southeastern coast of the Big Island, is a trailhead that leads to Puu Loa, Hawaii’s largest field of petroglyphs. The site, within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, contains over 23,000 centuries-old etchings—of dimples, circles, bars, even humans and sailing canoes—in hardened lava formed sometime between the years 1200 and 1450.

William Ellis, an English missionary who traveled to the Hawaiian Islands in the 1820s, was the first to describe the decorated puu, or hill, in writing. “On inquiry, we found that they [the petroglyphs] had been made by former travelers, from a motive similar to that which induces a person to carve his initials on a stone or tree, or a traveler to record his name in an album, to inform his successors that he had been there,” he wrote. “When there were a number of concentric circles with a dot or mark in the center, the dot signified a man, and the number of rings denoted the number in the party who had circumambulated the island.”

In addition to being a travelogue of sorts, the petroglyph field is a sacred site where native Hawaiians have been known to bury the umbilical cords of newborns. “A hole is made in the hard crust, the cord is put in and a stone is placed over it. In the morning the cord has disappeared; there is no trace of it. This insures long life for the child,” wrote anthropologist Martha Beckwith in 1914.

Read more on the Smithsonian's Website: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/Six-Sacred-Sites-of-Hawaii.html#ixzz1eN4do1JC

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park - December 2011


Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs


Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park is only 30 Minutes from Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast:

Hawai‘i National Park, HI – Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors throughout December. These programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Mark your calendars for these upcoming events:

When: Tues., Dec. 6, at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
Coral Road: The Poetry of Garrett Hongo. Garrett Hongo’s long-awaited third collection of poems continues his literary explorations into the history of the impermanent homeland his immigrant ancestors found in Hawai‘i. Join the Volcano native and acclaimed poet for an intimate, exhilarating, and soul-searching evening. Copies of Coral Road will be available for sale, and the author will sign copies upon request. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.


When: Tues., Dec. 13, at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
The Kuahiwis Live in Concert. Back by popular demand, the Kuahiwis bring their special blend of Hawaiian music, hula, and family deeply rooted in the volcanic soil of Hawai‘i. Join T.R. Ireland, Kiliona Young, and Grant Ka‘au‘a as they blend classic songs of their upbringing with modern rhythms and melodies of today. Copies of their award-winning CD, Hawaiian Music, will be available for sale. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.


When: Wed., Dec. 14 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Kalo. Join Sam and Edna Buldado as they share their knowledge and cultural uses of the kalo (taro) plant. Kalo is highly significant to Hawaiians, and is used for many things, including food, medicine, glue, and dyes. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.


When: Tues., Dec. 20 at 7 p.m. (auditorium opens at 6:30 p.m.)
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
John Keawe Live in Concert. Award-winning slack-key (kīhō‘alu) guitarist, composer and recording artist, John Keawe, brings his warm, original style of music to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park for the holidays. His wife Hope provides moving interpretations of his music with her graceful hula. This program is expected to be well attended, so come early for seating. John’s CDs and DVDs will be available for purchase. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.


When: Wed., Dec. 21 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. (auditorium opens at 6:15 p.m.)
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium
Hula and Mele with Haunani’s Hula Expressions. Come sing along to your favorite Hawaiian melodies with this award-winning group of lively elders (kūpuna) who sing and dance hula to the sweet sound of hapa haole music, and make all of their own costumes and lei. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” series of cultural programs. Free.


When: Wed., Dec. 28 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
‘Ukulele with Oral Abihai. Join Oral Abihai as he shares his passion for making ‘ukulele from discarded or naturally fallen pieces of wood. Learning only several years ago in Lahaina from Kenny Potts, he has since made more than 50 ‘ukulele. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

Friday, November 11, 2011

Hawaii Bed and Breakfast - Veteran's Day


Veteran's Day at Hale Moana Hawaii Bed and Breakfast


Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast participated in the B&B for Vets Initiative for the second year, where hundreds of B&Bs throughout the US and Canada honor active and retired veterans with free rooms in recognition of their services. 


We were so pleased and honored to host Lani & Cody Cook from Aiea on Oahu for our Veteran’s Day Special. Cody is an E4 Fire Support Specialist and his reserve unit is part of the 100th Battalion 442nd Infantry Regiment. He was deployed to Afghanistan in 2008 and his unit is scheduled to go back in 2012.



Lani and Cody, originally from Kauai, are a young couple and have been married for three years. It has been tough for them lately as Cody lost his regular job at Schofield Barracks on Oahu as a security guard. Because of Federal cut-backs he and 69 others were laid off in August. Since then the couple has lived on Lani’s Bank-of-Hawaii-income and unemployment. It has been a struggle to pay their rent and get by. Lani explained, that ever since then she has become a follower of Krazy Suzy's Coupons and in Suzy’s weekly newsletter is also where she found out about the B&Bs for Vets Initiative. 

Lani said, “This was a blessing for us. We had not been on a vacation since we got married.” When they checked out the B&Bs for Vets website, however, they realized that there were only B&Bs on Maui and the Big Island participating in the initiative. Their hopes sank, because they did not think they would be able to afford a trip to another island. But then they realized that Hawaiian Airline miles would pay for their tickets and that they would be able to spend time with family in Kona for a few days. The stay at Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast was their last night and highlight of their trip before they went back home. 

They both said that they had a wonderful time here on the Big Island, leaving their financial worries behind and just enjoying life for a few days.

We are so happy, that this special went to a young couple in need, who would have not been able to afford a stay here otherwise. We all felt, that the Aloha of this special place Hawaii embraced all of us and our souls touched for a brief moment. We truly wish them the very best and we feel blessed to have met them. We all promised to stay in touch.

Monday, November 7, 2011

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park - November 2011


Hawaiian Cultural Programs


Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park is only 30 Minutes from Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast:

Hawai‘i National Park, HI – Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture with the community and visitors throughout November. These programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Mark your calendars for these upcoming events:

When: Wed., Nov. 9 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitors Center lānai
 Lā‘au Lapa‘au (“Healing Medicine”). Learn how plants are used as medicine. Ka‘ohu Monfort shares her knowledge of how Hawai‘i’s native plants, including noni, ha‘uowī, kī, kukui and ōlena, can heal and nourish. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

When: Wed., Nov. 16 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. (auditorium opens at 6:15 p.m.)
Where: Kīlauea Visitors Center Auditorium
Hawaiian Music by Hilo One. Come enjoy an evening of Hawaiian music with the musical trio, Hilo One. Brothers Aaron Agres (electric upright bass and vocals) and Likeke Teanio (lead guitarist, ukulele and vocals) join acoustic 12-string rhythm guitarist Kahele Miura, for a night of Hawaiian and slack key guitar music. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” series of cultural programs. Free.


When: Wed., Nov. 23 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitors Center lānai
Poi Making. Park Ranger Jason Zimmer (“J.Z.”) shares the art of making poi, a skill he learned from his grandfather, Daniel Kawaiaea, Sr. more than 10 years ago. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Hawaii Island - Winter in the Tropics


Hawaii - Winter in the Tropics


 
The last 24 hours of thunder and lightning down here, where we are powdered the top of the Mauna Kea and Mona Loa with snow. The contrasts are amazing!