Friday, December 28, 2012

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park - Kahuku



Hike, Explore, & Celebrate 

Kahuku’s Tenth Anniversary

Stay at Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast and visit the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park:

Hawaii National Park, HI Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park celebrates the tenth anniversary of Kahuku in 2013 by offering free programs to introduce visitors and residents to the park’s southernmost section, January through March 2013:

NEW! Lunch with a Ranger at Kahuku.  Bring a bag lunch and join Hawaii Volcanoes National Park rangers on select dates.  Over lunch, rangers guide an open discussion on topics ranging from land management and conservation issues to environmental and cultural history.  Lunch with a Ranger sessions are scheduled for Jan. 12, Jan. 27, Feb. 17, Mar. 17 and Mar. 30. at 11:30 a.m. To get there, drive through the Kahuku gate located on the mauka side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Park and meet at the visitor contact tent, near the ranch buildings. Check the activities board for the location and topic of the day. No advance registration required.

People and Land of Kahuku is a two-mile, three-hour expedition that explores the pastures, a quarry, an airstrip, and the 1868 lava fields of Kahuku. Rangers explain how people lived on the vast Kahuku lands, from the earliest Hawaiians through today. Walk in emerging native forest, hear about Kahuku’s history of violent earthquakes and eruptions and the residents who survived them, and find out how Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park plans to restore and protect the native ecosystem and cultural sites.

The guided hike is offered Jan. 13, Jan. 20, Feb. 9, Feb. 23, Mar. 10, and Mar. 24 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  To get there, drive through the Kahuku gate located on the mauka side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Park and meet at the visitor contact tent, near the ranch buildings. Boots, rain gear, long pants plus water and a snack are recommended. No advance registration required.

Palm Trail is a relatively easy 2.6 mile loop traversing scenic pasture along an ancient cinder cone with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer.  Highlights include relics of the ranching era, sections of remnant native forest and amazing volcanic features from the 1868 eruptive fissures.

A guided hike of Palm Trail is offered Jan. 19, Feb. 10, and Mar. 16 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. To get there, drive through the Kahuku gate located on the mauka side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Park and meet at the visitor contact tent, near the ranch buildings. Boots, raingear, long pants plus water and a snack are recommended. No advance registration required.



Contact: Jessica Ferracane/Public Affairs, Jessica_ferracane@nps.gov , 808-985-6018
 

Saturday, December 8, 2012

Native Hawaiian Landscaping


 Native Hawaiian Landscaping

Stroll through our garden at Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast and discover many of the native Hawaiian plants.

By Denise Laitinen - When you think about landscaping your yard, your thoughts are probably along the lines of what plants will look pretty, what will grow, and how easy it will be to maintain. You’re probably not thinking about perpetuating native Hawaiian culture or being able to tell stories to your friends and family during [...]

By Denise Laitinen
When you think about landscaping your yard, your thoughts are probably along the lines of what plants will look pretty, what will grow, and how easy it will be to maintain. You’re probably not thinking about perpetuating native Hawaiian culture or being able to tell stories to your friends and family during your next barbeque.
Yet using native Hawaiian plants around your home enables you to have attractive landscaping that is cost efficient, low in water use, culturally important, AND makes you seem knowledgeable to your houseguests.
Some people think that having native Hawaiian plants in the landscaping might be a burden because they require more care and attention. In reality, the opposite is true.

“Using native plants is the most environmentally conscious way of landscaping your yard,” says Matt Schirman, a Hawaiian plant specialist and co-founder of Hui Kū Maoli Ola. The landscaping company works to educate legislators and businesses about the importance of native Hawaiian plants and also provides native plants to local big box stores.

“Because they’re not invasive, the native plants aren’t going to take over your yard,” adds Schirman. “Since these types of plants are literally right at home, he adds, these plants require less maintenance, which in turn means less fertilization and pruning.”

So what types of native plants should you use in your yard? Factors such as elevation, pressure variations, rainfall, wind, and topography should be considered before selecting a particular plant species. Given that Hawai‘i Island is home to 11 of the 13 climate zones found in the world, each of which has its own unique ecosystem and weather characteristics, it’s a good idea to check with a local nursery or landscaper to determine what native plants work best for your area.

Whichever native plants you choose, the benefits are bountiful. One benefit of using native Hawaiian plants, in addition to them looking beautiful, is that they often require less water than introduced or invasive plants. “We have plant species that have co-evolved with the environment so they have low water requirements,” explains Schirman. It’s an important consideration for many Hawai‘i Island subdivisions where residents have to pay for private or county water.

One of the most important reasons to use native Hawaiian plants is also the most basic. Simply put, the plants are Hawaiian. According to the Bishop Museum, the aloha state has more endangered plants and animals per square mile than any other place on the planet. And 90 percent of native plants in Hawai‘i are endemic, meaning they are found only here in the Hawaiian Islands.

Equally important, native Hawaiian plants are inextricablytied to the history and culture of Hawai‘i.
“What makes Hawai‘i unique?” asks Schirman, who was a Hawaiian studies professor at UH-Manoa before becoming a licensed landscaper and launching a native plant business 13 years ago. “If we look at our culture, the base of our culture is the plants. If we have an endemic plant in Hawai‘i that’s associated with a cultural practice, that cultural practice is thereby endemic. If the plant goes extinct, then that practice and a bit of our culture goes extinct as well,” explains Schirman.

“The idea is to help propagate and grow these native plants in people’s yards. Then they’ll be able to continue these cultural practices associated with these plants. “For instance, if we plant palapalai in our yard, as opposed to going into the forest to harvest it, then we’re allowing those forest patches to grow and be used only for special occasions because for everyday material we have it right in our yard.”

If planting native plants is important then planting rare and endangered plants is even more important.
“The idea is to propagate the endangered plants and put them into the landscape,” he says. “The thought is that you’re putting one more plant into the ground that will be able to grow and reproduce seeds.”

Incorporating rare and endangered native plants is as easy as using commonly found plants in terms of maintenance and water use. However, you will want to consult a landscaper or nursery to find out about purchasing such plants. Sometimes people just don’t realize how easy it is to use native plants or they are new to the island and don’t understand what is and is not a native plant.

During the last housing boom on Hawai‘i Island, it sometimes seemed as if entire subdivisions sprouted seemingly overnight, especially in west Hawai‘i. All too often the landscaping reflected scenery reminiscent of mainland locations with non-native plant species, such as bougainvillea shrubs and fountain grass (which happens to be a highly flammable plant).

However, Schirman says he has noticed a trend over the past decade of more and more people becoming interested in using native plants around their homes. He recalls property owners in the west Hawai‘i subdivision of Hualālai contacting him a few years ago wanting to use native plants around their newly built home.

The homeowners have a keen interest in conservation, yet travel frequently, so he needed plants that are low maintenance. Since the house was designed with entertaining in mind, they also wanted plants that were pretty, yet could also be educational. After receiving general input from the homeowners and looking at the environmental parameters, such as shade, sun, wind, and water availability, Schirman looked at the aesethics.

Most landscapers use themes when creating a landscape. When it comes to native Hawaiian plants, Schirman says people can use medicinal plants, things that they can harvest and use as medicine, or plants that tell a story.

“The plants for this particular house were selected more for their storytelling than their medicinal uses because the owners are really committed to using and promoting native plants,” says Schirman, who opted to use 31 different species of native plants, including several kumulipo plants.

The Kumulipo is Hawai‘i’s creation chant. More than 2,000 lines long, the chant describes the origin of all life on earth. The chant describes how as species evolved in the ocean, they also began to evolve “partners” on land.

It is premised on the idea that all things in nature, including humans, are related like family, and that they must depend on each other for there to be balance and harmony in life. To that end, the Kumulipo describes how living things in different kingdoms are paired, such as fish and plants. Thus, kumulipo plants are plant species described within the Kumulipo that have an ocean counterpart.

“In the Kumulipo there is something created on land that looks after something that was created in the ocean,” explains Schirman. “This Kumulipo connection is very much part of the modern discourse on watershed management,” says Schirman. “It’s really something our ancient ancestors understood. They understood that we need to have something on land that protects things in the ocean. We need to watch our land management to protect our ocean.”

One of the kumulipo plants Schirman used in his landscape design is the hāpu‘u fern.
“The story behind hāpu‘u is that it’s also the name of the Hawaiian sea bass,” explains Schirman. Part of the grouper family, Hawaiian sea bass are called hāpu‘upu‘u in Hawaiian. They are similar to the hāpu‘u plant because they grow very slowly and there are not that many in Hawai‘i. Statewide, the last remaining large stands of native hāpu‘u are found here on Hawai‘i Island. Their numbers are being rapidly reduced by clearing and development, except in protected areas such as Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

However, not all kumulipo plants are rare or native. The ti leaf plant is not native to Hawai‘i and is used frequently in cultural practices. “Ti leaf is a Polynesian-introduced plant that came into these islands a couple thousand years ago with the original Polynesian settlers. It’s one of those plants that has proven to not be an invasive species because it’s been here for 2,000 years, and it’s not a specific native plant.”

It’s a plant commonly found in yards all over Hawai‘i Island, yet few people are aware of its Kumulipo connection. “Ti leaf is found within the Kumulipo,” explains Schirman. “It’s called lau‘ī—a contraction of the word lau and ki, so it brings those two words together and basically means ti leaf.

“The fish counterpart is the lau‘īpala or yellow tang fish. Translated, lau‘īpala literally means yellow leaf. Pala
means to be overly ripe. So if you look at the overly ripe leaves of the ti plant they are yellow, very much like the lau‘īpala you see in the ocean,” says Schirman.

In addition to kumulipo plants, Schirman used several rare and endangered plants around this particular property. ‘Uki‘uki is a blueberry plant, and its flowers are the only native lily in Hawai‘i. While the blueberry itself is not edible, ancient Hawaiians used the blueberry to dye kapa.

Schirman says one of the very rare plants he used at this particular property is the ‘ohai. A native plant, the only place it grows on Hawai‘i Island is in South Point. He also planted āhinahina, which is typically only found on Maui. In all, Schirman used 31 different varieties of native and endangered plants around the property. You may not be able to use as many native plants in your yard, however incorporating just a few will go a long way to promoting an environmentally conscious landscape.

And you can bet that after your next dinner guests hear the story of the ti plant, whenever they see one they will probably think of the yellow tang fish.

Mahalo to Ethan Tweedie for his photography used in this article. EthanTweedie.com

Contact writer Denise Laitinen: wahineokekai@yahoo.com

Monday, November 26, 2012

Hawaii Lava Entering The Ocean


Lava Reaches The Ocean on Hawaii Island

 


Stay at Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast and see the lava:

See here the Hawaii News Now up-date.

Hawaii island tour operators enjoyed their own version of Black Friday weekend when lava from Kilauea Volcano’s Puu Oo vent spilled into the ocean Saturday afternoon, prompting a surge of business from locals and visitors eager to witness the spectacle.

Geologists from the University of Hawaii-Hilo were on hand when the lava met the ocean around 1 p.m. at a location just east of the eastern foundry of the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

The lava entering the ocean comes from one of two active flows on the coastal plain.

The volume of lava pouring into the ocean has not yet produced the dramatic steam clouds seen in previous ocean entries. Regardless, tour operators in the area had all the business they could handle today.

“It’s always steady around here,” said Shane Turpin, lead captain at Lava Ocean Adventures and Lava Ocean Tours Inc. “It’s just more people are interested in seeing the active flow where it’s entering the ocean.

“When it does touch the ocean, we run a more specialized just-lava-watching tour,” he said. “Being able to see it on land is one thing; when it’s touching the ocean, it’s quite an exciting time.”

Turpin spent part of a hectic Sunday morning on a video shoot for the Weather Channel.

An experienced tour operator, Turpin has learned to react quickly to opportunity.
“I’ve been following this volcano my whole life, and I’ve stopped trying to predict it,” he said. “I just sit here and enjoy it when it’s happening.”

Blue Hawaiian Helicopters manager Chelsea Nichols said business at the Hilo location increased over the weekend with people interested in viewing the relatively rare event.

The eruption in Kilauea’s middle east rift zone started on Jan. 3, 1983, and has continued with few interruptions at Puu Oo Cone or from vents within a few kilometers to the east and west, according to the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

On Sept. 21, 2011, a fissure eruption on the east flank of Puu Oo drained lava lakes and fed a flow that passed through the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision and into the ocean.

The lava entered the ocean in December, but the flow stopped in January and hadn't reached the ocean again until this weekend.

Here are different ways of seeing the lava, when you are staying at Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast:

The Kalapana Lava Viewing Area is only 10 minutes from our Bed & Breakfast at the end of Hwy. 130. From here you can see lava flowing down the mountain towards the ocean from a distance. This area is easily accessible.

Lava Hiking Tours: Guided tours out to the lava are available almost daily through Kalapana Cultural Tours from Kalapana (10 minutes from us). The hike will take you directly to the lava flow. Guest feedback for these walks is excellent. You have to be in physically good condition to do the hike. Flashlights and water will be provided.

Lava Boat Tours by Lava Ocean Adventures leave from the Pohoiki boat ramp, which is a 10 minute drive from our B&B. When the lava flows into the ocean it is an unbelievable experience to see how the elements meet. Captain Shane and his crew are an experienced team and offer visitors an unforgettable trip.

Helicopter Tours from the Hilo Airport offer an aerial view of the Pu'u O'o crater, eruption areas, lava flows and ocean entry, when lava flows into the water. Flights are only available during the day, no night flights for safety reasons. Helicopter Tour operators include: Blue Hawaiian, Paradise & Safari Helicopters.

Friday, October 5, 2012

Lava Flows in Kalapana on Hawaii Big Island



Lava Reaches Coastal Plain on Hawaii Island

 


Stay at Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast and see the lava several different ways:
(Lava pictures - courtesy Kalapana Cultural Tours)

The Kalapana Lava Viewing Area is only 10 minutes from our Bed & Breakfast at the end of Hwy. 130. From here you can see lava flowing down the mountain towards the ocean from a distance. This area is easily accessible.

Lava Hiking Tours: Guided tours out to the lava are available almost daily through Kalapana Cultural Tours from Kalapana (10 minutes from us). The hike will take you directly to the lava flow. Guest feedback for these walks is excellent. You have to be in physically good condition to do the hike. Flashlights and water will be provided.

Lava Boat Tours by Lava Ocean Adventures leave from the Pohoiki boat ramp, which is a 10 minute drive from our B&B. When the lava flows into the ocean it is an unbelievable experience to see how the elements meet. Captain Shane and his crew are an experienced team and offer visitors an unforgettable trip.

Helicopter Tours from the Hilo Airport offer an aerial view of the Pu'u O'o crater, eruption areas, lava flows and ocean entry, when lava flows into the water. Flights are only available during the day, no night flights for safety reasons. Helicopter Tour operators include: Blue Hawaiian, Paradise & Safari Helicopters.


Please, see the following lava up-date and video from Big Island Video News:
October 5, 2012
Photos courtesy USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, video courtesy Bo Lozoff | Voice of Stephanie Salazar

http://www.bigislandvideonews.com/2012/10/05/lava-reaches-coastal-plain-on-hawaii-island/

KALAPANA, Hawaii: Lava has once again reached the base of the Pulama Pali near Kalapana.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory says advancing surface flows have reached the base of the pali over the past few days, burning through one of the few remaining forested kipuka in the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision.

The latest update from the HVO website’s Kilauea eruption update (Oct. 5):

More lava lobes reached the base of the pali yesterday within the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision and pooled on the coastal plain without advancing significant seaward. Yesterday, HVO and UHH geologists found that the flows had not advanced more than 150 m (490 ft) from the base of the pali. The pali flows have been easily visible from the County Viewing Area located to the east in Kalapana and mobile cam 3 while the flows on the coastal plain are in view of mobile cams 2 and 4.
USGS photo showing the outline of the flow down the pali HVO released this photo (right), where a white line marks the outline of the active flows.

Another photo shows a closer view of lava flows cascading down onto the coastal plain at the base of the pali. A remnant section of Orchid Street is visible just above the center of the image. Meanwhile, intrepid lava lover Bo Lozoff, who often guides lava field hikes when things heat up on the coastal plain, captured this video of the kipuku burning in Royal Gardens.

He also captured these images the immense lava flow. You can follow Lozoff’s volcano updates on his YouTube channel, “lavaloverbo” where he uploads video like this following his hiking adventures.



According to the USGS, this map above shows the currently active Peace Day flow (episode 61) “as the two shades of red—light red is the extent of the flow from September 21, 2011, to September 25, 2012, and bright red marks the mapped flow expansion from September 25 to October 4. There have been flow margin changes upslope, in the upper part of Royal Gardens, that are not yet mapped and not shown on this map. The active lava tube is delineated by the yellow line within the active flow field. An incipient tube extends downslope to feed the currently active flows, but it has not been mapped. The contour interval on Puʻu ʻŌʻō is 5 m.”

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Hilo Coconut Festival on Coconut Island - October 20



First Annual Hilo Coconut Festival - October 20

Stay at Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast and visit the Hilo, Pearl of the Pacific - only 30 minutes away.


The 1st Annual Hilo Coconut Festival will take place on Coconut Island, a small island park in Hilo Bay, located right next to the hotels along Banyan Drive, on Saturday, October 20, 2012, from 10 am – 5 pm. This Festival is free to the public, and a perfect location for families and friends interested in a fun day of demonstrations on drum-making, weaving,rope-making and more. Traditional Hawaiian culture will be on exhibit with Hula dancing, ukele playing, and local entertainment.

The highlight of the Festival will be a celebration of Hawaiian coconuts, and their multitude of uses from soap, cosmetics, coconut meat, coconut oil, and the processing of coconuts into refreshing drinks. The cultural and religious significance of the coconut will also be addressed. Coconut items will be on sale as well as treats and local dishes.

Demonstrations of the uses and development of Hawaiian sugarcane, teas, and the Hala plant will also be explored. Amongst all of these symbols of Hawaiian culture will be children’s activities, such as face-painting, coconut bowling, coconut toss, and more. If you are interested in being a vendor or a sponsor, please contact Vince McMillon at cmcmillon@hawaii.rr.com. Check back for updates, and vendor applications.
For more information see the Hawaii Tribune Herald

Friday, September 7, 2012

Volcano Art Center in the Park - Hula Kahiko on Saturday



Volcano Art Center  - Na Mea Hawaii Hula Kahiko

Stay at Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast and visit the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the Volcano Art Center - only 30 minutes away.

Volcano Art Center welcomes Halau Hula Ka Makani Hali ‘Ala O Puna to upcoming Na Mea Hawaii Hula Kahiko

Each month the Volcano Art Center (VAC) celebrates the traditions and art of hula through “Na Mea Hawaii Hula Kahiko” performances in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Halau Hula Ka Makani Hali ‘Ala O Puna, under the direction of Kumu Hula Ehulani Stephany, will grace the pa hula with their awe-inspiring style of Hawaiian dance and chant on Saturday, September 15, 2012.

Halau Hula Ka Makani Hali ‘Ala O Puna under the direction of Kumu Hula Ehulani Stephany
Since 1980, VAC has held the responsibility and privilege of inviting hula schools from all over Hawaii to perform at the stone hula platform, which is reserved exclusively for the perpetuation of traditional hula and chant. For cultural practitioners, an offering of hula in the presence of Halema’uma’u crater at the summit of Kilauea, the legendary home of the volcano goddess Pele, is especially inspiring.

For the hour-long outdoor performance starting at 10:30am, the audience is encouraged to bring mats for sitting on the grass and be prepared for variable weather conditions. On the same day, traditional Hawaiian arts and craft demonstrations will be held on the front porch of the Volcano Art Center Gallery from 9:30am to 1:30pm. Demonstrations include hands-on displays and lessons where all ages are invited to meet, learn from and talk story with friendly and knowledgeable locals.

Na Mea Hawaii Hula Kahiko is a free community event presented in cooperation with Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and supported in part by the County of Hawaii’s Department of Research and Development and the Hawaii Tourism Authority. As park entrance fees apply and parking is limited, carpooling is strongly recommended. For more information, visit www.volcanoartcenter.org or call (808) 967-8222.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Pahoa - Puna - Big Island of Hawaii



Pahoa in Puna on the Big Island of Hawaii



Pahoa is the closest town and only 5 minutes from Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast. Besides an alternative flair, it offers several excellent restaurants, grocery stores, a natural food store, health clinics, doctors' offices, pharmacies, three banks, interesting arts & crafts shops, and an open market on weekend mornings. Pahoa is a historic town, built between 1909 and 1919. It began as a mill town, shaping railway ties for the great western railways. In sugar cane days, Pahoa became the crossroads for the railway. Today's industry consists of the diversified agriculture and tropical flower business.   

Pahoa History

By Hiro Sato – Pahoa Yesterday
"One hundred years have passed since the early immigrants settled in Pahoa in the latter decades of the
nineteenth century. Unfortunately there are hardly any  recorded historical accounts of Pahoa’s early years. The history of Pahoa should have been recorded by some of the immigrants or the earlier Niseis during the 1950s when most of the immigrants and the older Niseis were still living. During those years they were healthy with keen memories, able to recall and document information relating to the various events and activities that transpired during the late l800s and the first half of the twentieth century. The need to record
Pahoa’s history was constantly stressed to me from the mid-1980s by Shiryo Miyatake, an Issei, who arrived in Hawaii in 1918 from Hiroshima-ken, Japan. Stanley Oishi, one of the younger Niseis, and Robert Sugihara, a Sansei, also stressed the urgency of documenting the history of Pahoa very soon; otherwise all of the information relating to the early immigrants would be lost and gone forever.
It must have been fate that I was born as the eldest son of a large family, whose parents were poor and constantly in financial debt. Unable to continue my formal schooling after completing the ninth grade at Pahoa School, I remained in Pahoa throughout the many years to the present day. It was my destiny that I remained in Pahoa to research and write the many happenings of the lumber and sugar industries in which the immigrants worked and to document their contributions to the community. What actually prompted me to write Pahoa’s history?

From the mid-1980s I realized the importance of preserving Pahoa’s history. Noticing that hardly anything was recorded previously, I was concerned for the loss of the history, so I began collecting information about the early days of Pahoa."


Sugar Cane Days
 
The sugar cane plant was brought to the Hawaiian Islands by the Polynesians in outrigger canoes many centuries ago. Sugar cane was part of the traditional native Hawaiian diet. The Polynesians and early Hawaiians did not dream or realize that this “sweet plant would ultimately change the physical appearance and lifestyle of the islands. Through the economic resources of the sugar plantations, tiny villages became flourishing communities. Thousands of acres of the natural forests were cleared for the cultivation of sugar cane, which changed the environment. The mass production of sugar by the many plantations required recruiting labor from foreign countries,
The arrival of foreign immigrants had the greatest impact on the Hawaiian race, as Hawaii’s population became cosmopolitan.

Many of the immigrants were bachelors and later married Hawaiian women. These interracial marriages resulted in greatly reducing the number of pure Hawaiians, and presently, the pure Hawaiian race is at the brink of extinction.

The first successful planting and production of sugar was at Koloa, Kauai by Ladd and Company. Earlier crude mills had been operated by the early Chinese immigrants on the island of Lanai. By 1880 there were seventy-two sugar plantations in Hawaii, One of the last plantations to be established was Olaa Sugar Company which harvested its first sugar crop in 1902.

Saw Mill in Pahoa 

The lumber mill was situated about one hundred twenty-five feet east of the present Akebono Theater. It was commonly called “Pahoa tie  millu”  by  the  Japanese  immigrants.  The  Japanese a  vowel  to  words  ending  with  a  consonant  (except  N), therefore mill was pronounced “millu.” The lumber company was originally started as the Hawaiian Mahogany Lumber Company, also referred to as Pahoa Lumber Company and later, the Hawaii Hardwood Company,  James B.  Castle of  Honolulu  was  behind this company and Lorrin Thurston seems to have been financially during  the  early  years.
 
Railroad in Pahoa

The railroad ties processed at the Pahoa Lumber Mill (1907-1918) were transported on rail flat cars to Hilo wharf and then transshipped on steamships to the mainland USA. Olaa Sugar Company transported a daily average of one hundred cars loaded with four tons of sugar cane each from Pahoa to Olaa Mill until 1948 when trucks began hauling directly from the fields to the mill.


Pahoa Restaurants (recommended by Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast)


  • Kaleo’s (Pacific Rim Cuisine): Tell them about your reservation with us and receive 10% off your bill!
  • Ning’s (Thai Cuisine): Tell them about your reservation with us and receive 10% off your bill! Ning’s is a BYOB.
  • Paolo’s Bistro (Italian Cuisine): Tell them about your reservation with us and receive 10% off your bill! Paolo’s is a BYOB.
  • Luquin’s (Mexican Cuisine)  
  • There are many other eateries and take-out places, including Subway, L&L, No.1 Chinese BBQ, Boogie Woogie Pizza, Sushi, Burger King, KFC, etc.
Pahoa Shopping
 

Friday, August 24, 2012

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park - Kahuku



Hike, Explore, & Protect Kahuku

Stay at Hale Moana Bed & Breakfast and visit the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park - only 30 minutes away.

Hawaii National Park, HI Three free and adventurous programs offered by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will introduce a captivating landscape, biodiversity and history of the park’s southernmost section to hikers.
Palm Trail. The new Palm Trail is a relatively easy 2.6 mile loop traversing through scenic pasture along an ancient cinder cone with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer.  Along the way are relics of the ranching era, sections of remnant native forest and amazing volcanic features from the 1868 eruptive fissures.

A guided hike of Palm Trail is offered Sept. 15 and 29 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Drive through the Kahuku gate, which is located on the mauka side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Park and meet at the visitor contact tent, near the ranch buildings. Boots, raingear, long pants plus water and a snack are recommended. No advance registration is required.

People and Land of Kahuku is a two-mile, three-hour expedition through pastures, a quarry, an airstrip and the 1868 lava fields of Kahuku. Rangers will explain how people lived on the vast Kahuku lands, from the earliest Hawaiians through today. Walk in emerging native forest, hear about Kahuku’s history of violent earthquakes and eruptions and the residents who survived them, and find out how Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park plans to restore the native ecosystem and protect Kahuku’s cultural sites.

The guided hike is offered Aug. 26, Sept. 9, Sept. 22, Oct. 14 and Nov. 10 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  Drive through the Kahuku gate, which is located on the mauka side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Park and meet at the visitor contact tent, near the ranch buildings. Boots, raingear, long pants plus water and a snack are recommended. No advance registration is required.

Kīpuka Akihi is a challenging 1.5 mile, five-hour adventure to see some of the rare plants and wildlife that inhabit this treasured kīpuka. Participants must be prepared to scramble over fallen trees, lava rock, and slippery, wet terrain. Wear sturdy hiking shoes, long pants, sunscreen and a hat. Bring raingear, garden gloves, a day pack, insect repellent, lunch and water. This forest stewardship program provides opportunities to help protect this rainforest by pulling up invasive kāhili ginger and other invasive non-native plants throughout the kīpuka. No advance registration is required.

This expedition into Kahuku’s isolated refuge of rare plants is offered Aug. 25, Sept. 23, Oct. 21 and Nov. 24 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Drive through the Kahuku gate, which is located on the mauka side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Park and meet at the visitor contact tent, near the ranch buildings.

Release Date:  August 22, 2012
Contact: Jessica Ferracane/Public Affairs, Jessica_ferracane@nps.gov , 808-985-6018